Ottawa Ladies College Hockey Group, March 1906 and Carleton College

This photo shows a group of women playing hockey in 1906.

They are part of the ottawa women’s college which was established in 1869 and used to be located near downtown.  In 1913 a new building was designed by architect Alan Keefer (1883-1952; also architect of  ‘Stornaway’) and it was opened in 1914. It was located in he Glebe at Lyon and First avenue.  The college would become Carleton College in 1948 (the building below as it looked in 1948) where classes would be held until the late 1950s, when the college would become a university, and moved to just south dow’s lake.

As you can see from the following images (courtesy of the carleton university archives) the college was very much part of the glebe, using a number of different nearby buildings, such as Glebe St. James Church (now the GCC ) for a ceremony:

Or a house on first avenue,ca. 1948, used as thestudent union

Or the street used for a marching band in 1952 for convocation:

The roof  of nearby 291 first ave was used for various activities, such as hanging graduation gowns in 1952:

And the rest of 291 first avenue was used by the school of public administration:

Advertisements

2 thoughts on “Ottawa Ladies College Hockey Group, March 1906 and Carleton College

  1. The flat roof (with hanging gowns) cannot be tiny 291 First Ave. The main building – 268 First, corner of Lyon – extends back to 2nd Ave (across from the former St. James Church) and the back portion had a large flat roof as can bee seen from GeoOttawa aerial photos 1958-1991. That is the flat rooftop pictured, just across the street from the dome of St. James.
    Also, the house used as the Student Union is very clearly 275 First Ave. (Neither 291 nor 275 appear to have changed much in current StreetView images.)

    • Thank you for your comments…the information came from the Carleton University Archives and Special Collections. You might want to get in touch with them so that they can have the information updated.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s